Rik Schneider Online

Sunday, November 25, 2012

Guy John: Frank Chodorov on Political Change in 1953- The GOP Response to FDR Progressivism


From Guy John- Frank Chodorov in 1953-
Source: Guy John: Frank Chodorov on Political Change in 1953

By the time the Republican Party finally came back to power in 1953, they made the political calculation and perhaps a policy calculation that the FDR New Deal was here to stay, both politically and perhaps on policy grounds. That it wouldn't be smart to try to turn it back and that they should make the best out of it, not destroy it or expand. But make the best of it as they possibly can and by the time Richard Nixon came to power in 1969, the Nixon Administration decided that especially with a heavy Democratic Congress, full of FDR/LBJ Progressive Democrats, that they had no shot of rolling back the FDR New Deal and LBJ Great Society. And they decided to take a Conservative- Federalist approach to the safety net in America and try to give the states and locals as much authority as possible to deal with the issues they face when it comes to social welfare policy and gave them more power to try to run these programs. Rather than taking a Conservative-Libertarian approach that government has no role here.

The Eisenhower-Nixon Federalist approach to social welfare policy in America, was not good enough for the Frank Chodorov/Barry Goldwater Conservative-Libertarians in the Republican Party. They believe they came to power in the 1950s to roll back FDR/Harry Truman progressivism. Which is why the John Birch Society and others on the Far-Right and Libertarian-Right, implied that Dwight Eisenhower who fought communism and fascism as a U.S. Army general in World War I and World War II, was a closeted Socialist if not Communist. Even though he was a staunch cold warrior and , anti-Communist, pro-capitalist and pro-American liberal democracy. Ideology, but not politically Dwight Eisenhower was a Liberal Democrat. And what I mean by that is that he believed in liberal; democracy and was anti-communism. And yet the John Birchers and others on the Far-Right, saw President Eisenhower as soft on communism. And one of those reasons was because he believed in a public safety net for people who needed it. But opposed a welfare state that would try to manage people's lives for them. Which is more common in Scandinavia.

I believe a big reason for the creation of the Libertarian Party in the early 1970s, has to do with do very important men and Republicans in the 1950s and 1970s. These two men being Dwight Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. Classical Conservatives and Libertarians, believed the two main reasons for the Republican Party, was to defeat communism and roll back the FDR New Deal and LBJ Great Society. Which is why they loved Barry Goldwater in 1964 and there after and how Ronald Reagan becomes a big star on the Republican-Right in the 1960s. Because he hated socialism and communism and ran on returning power back to the American people. Which meant to him ending the New Deal and Great Society. Which is a goal he abandoned when he became President in 1981, but he always remained an anti-Communist and anti-Socialist. Frank Chodorov in 1953 represented what the so-called Old Right was thinking back then. That the Eisenhower Administration and Republican Congress then, shouldn't modify the safety net, but instead outlaw it.